Funeral Arrangements

Funeral arrangements are normally made following the registration or upon completion of a Coroner’s enquiry.  However, should there be a delay, we would be happy to see you sooner to make provisional arrangements.  We ask you to make an appointment to arrange a funeral, so that we can ensure a funeral director is available to talk to you. The funeral director will need to have in due course, the Certificate for Burial or Cremation (green form) which the registrars will have given you when you registered the death.

Your appointment with our funeral director will take around one hour, depending on the level of detail that you wish to discuss and the complexity of the arrangements and funeral service. Our funeral directors hold the National Association of Funeral Directors Diploma.

If a person has died elsewhere in the UK or overseas, we can make arrangements for transportation back to our premises for a local funeral.  We can also handle arrangements when a person has passed away in this area and the funeral service is to be held elsewhere, as we have very close links with all parts of the country through our professional associations. We are also experienced in funeral arrangements to and from other countries and the various regulations and documents required.

We will need to discuss with you the following items:

  • Burial or cremation – Local options would be explained to you. If you require a funeral outside the area, we would be more than happy to assist.
  • If cremation is requested, we can advise you of the options available for the interment or scattering of cremated remains.
  • Format of the service, including liaison with a minister or civil celebrant. This can include readings and other personal touches and may also involve both a church service and a short committal service at a crematorium, or services of thanksgiving or a memorial service.
  • Requirements for transportation, e.g.motor hearse, motorcycle hearse, horse drawn hearse, how many limousines you require.
  • Requirements for coffin type and, for cremation, ashes caskets can also be discussed.
  • Music – The choice of music would depend on the style of service, either religious or non-religious. Hymns chosen by the family are often sung.  We have a full and comprehensive list of hymns and music available on the computerised music system at Worcester Crematorium. We can also arrange for a more traditional organist if you wish.
  • There will be a number of forms to be signed, and also we ask that you make us aware of any specific wishes of the deceased regarding their funeral details.

 

Registration of a Death

Once you have received the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death from the doctor, hospital, hospice or other place of death you will need to make arrangements to register the death.  Funeral  Directors are unable to register a death.  This is normally done by the next of kin or an executor of the deceased.  All of our local registrars now operate an appointment system, therefore please telephone them before visiting, a full list of contact details for the local registrars can be found HERE  It normally takes between 15 and 30 minutest to register a death, we can assist with Registrars outside the area, please ask if this is the case.

The Registrar will require the Doctors Medical Certificate of cause of death.  The Registrar will also need to know the date and place of death, together with the full name and surname (including maiden name) date and place of birth, occupation, usual address and whether the deceased was in receipt of a pension.  The registrar will issue you with a green certificate, which the funeral director requires as soon as possible.

Whilst you are at the registrars it is also advisable that you purchase copies of the entry into the register.  Banks, building societies and insurance companies will require sight of these to close accounts but they may not necessarily keep them, they will not always accept photocopies.

 

H M Coroner

There are various reasons why a death may have to be reported to the Coroner by a Doctor or by the Police.  The Coroner’s duty is to establish the cause of death when a doctor is unable to certify.  If this is the case, relatives will be kept informed of the situation by the Coroners Officer and they will be advised when they will be able to register.

 

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